Addressing Real-World Problems: Hurricanes in the Classroom

With all the beautiful weather we’ve been experiencing in Connecticut this September, the extreme weather occurring in other regions of our country may be especially distant in the minds of our students. Additionally, the extent to which students are developmentally prepared to grapple with these calamities will depend on their ages and stages. Regardless, there are developmentally appropriate ways for children across all grade levels to practice becoming engaged, active citizens – especially when experiences are anchored in an authentic, meaningful context that connects content and skills with children’s interests.

Full STEAM Ahead at St. Thomas Day School, New Haven

Community connections run deep at Seedlings Educators Collaborative, and not just for the students with Seedlings Workshop alums for teachers! Since many of the Seedlings facilitators and directors live and work in the New Haven area, there are always chances of running into someone, as was the case this spring when St. Thomas Day School fourth grade teacher Maria Freda ran into SEC director Judy Cuthbertson. That chance encounter yielded the following piece, which we wanted to share with you.

In My Classroom: Tapping into Local Resources in Diane Huot’s 1st Grade Classroom

In the summer of 2015, Conte West Hills School first grade teacher Diane Huot attended Seedlings for the first time. On the first day of every SEC summer workshop week, participants learn to see New Haven with fresh eyes through a tour of the city. One of the stops is to Grannis Island, the summer home of the Quinnipiac people, who used the salt marsh as a home base for oystering. Diane was inspired. Here was a rich resource just down the street from her school that was previously unknown to her. She could imagine building her whole curriculum around it, as SEC science facilitator Karen Zwick has done with her 4th and 5th grade class at Cold Spring School – and she did.